The slippery slope from tooth loss to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke

The slippery slope from tooth loss to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke
A number of studies show that loosing teeth and not replacing them leads to an increased risk of health problems.

There is a very clear correlation between masticatory efficiency (being able to chew properly) and eating nutritiously. There are numerous scientific articles about poor masticatory efficiency and diet. "The inability to eat hard, crunchy, vegetables and fruits, makes way for soft, processed, sugar laden foods, says Dr. Jack Lipkin. "It is common knowledge that obesity has become a major health concern in North America, and this, coupled with the statistics on tooth loss amongst North Americans, does not bode well for maintaining our health at its optimum."

At the simplest level, most chewing occurs over the two molars at the back of the mouth. To a lesser degree, the teeth in front of the molars, the bicuspids, are also involved in mastication. The major chewing muscles strap right across the molar area, so that maximum efficiency occurs over these teeth. When one loses a back tooth - a molar - perhaps due to tooth fracture, the space ideally can be filled with an implant retained crown. If the space is not filled, then typically over time, the teeth in front and behind the missing tooth collapse into the space. The tooth that was opposing the now missing tooth, again in time, has a high propensity to super erupt, that is to move into the space of the missing tooth.

"Although this tooth movement is not guaranteed, it is a very common finding when examining patients who have experienced tooth loss," adds Dr. Lipkin. "Due to the collapse of the adjacent teeth and movement of the opposing tooth, the bite changes making it less efficient and more difficult to chew on that side."
Typically, the person starts to do more chewing on the opposite side of the mouth, overloading that side with more and uneven bite forces. If a second tooth is lost, the problem compounds itself and pretty soon, one starts to chew on the front teeth, which starts a negative spiral downwards.

Front teeth are made to incise food, (like tearing a piece of lettuce when eating a salad) and not actually chew the food. That is the distinct role of the back teeth.

The oral facial environment along with the two jaw joints, is one of the most complex neuromuscular systems in the body. The jaw joint is the most complex joint in the human body. It is on the move, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every time we swallow. In the middle of the night, when we swallow while we are sleeping, the TM joints are in motion and “working”.

The jaw joints, teeth and the muscles controlling all the action, movement, and how they meet and occlude, (bite) is a very complex system with all parts interconnected. When multiple teeth are lost and not replaced, the entire system becomes less efficient and the component ‘parts’, start to wear down. This is very evident when one thinks about how many times one is out socially and in conversation with someone, and they look like they have worn down teeth or their teeth have disappeared under their lip!

When people show up at the dental office to get these issues attended to, these treatments become extremely complicated, involved and expensive. "It is very clear that replacing a missing tooth when it is lost, is a less expensive and a far healthier approach to your general and dental health, than leaving it until there is more breakdown."
A number of studies show that loosing teeth and not replacing them leads to an increased risk of health problems.

There is a very clear correlation between masticatory efficiency (being able to chew properly) and eating nutritiously. There are numerous scientific articles about poor masticatory efficiency and diet. "The inability to eat hard, crunchy, vegetables and fruits, makes way for soft, processed, sugar laden foods, says Dr. Jack Lipkin. "It is common knowledge that obesity has become a major health concern in North America, and this, coupled with the statistics on tooth loss amongst North Americans, does not bode well for maintaining our health at its optimum."

At the simplest level, most chewing occurs over the two molars at the back of the mouth. To a lesser degree, the teeth in front of the molars, the bicuspids, are also involved in mastication. The major chewing muscles strap right across the molar area, so that maximum efficiency occurs over these teeth. When one loses a back tooth - a molar - perhaps due to tooth fracture, the space ideally can be filled with an implant retained crown. If the space is not filled, then typically over time, the teeth in front and behind the missing tooth collapse into the space. The tooth that was opposing the now missing tooth, again in time, has a high propensity to super erupt, that is to move into the space of the missing tooth.

"Although this tooth movement is not guaranteed, it is a very common finding when examining patients who have experienced tooth loss," adds Dr. Lipkin. "Due to the collapse of the adjacent teeth and movement of the opposing tooth, the bite changes making it less efficient and more difficult to chew on that side."
Typically, the person starts to do more chewing on the opposite side of the mouth, overloading that side with more and uneven bite forces. If a second tooth is lost, the problem compounds itself and pretty soon, one starts to chew on the front teeth, which starts a negative spiral downwards.

Front teeth are made to incise food, (like tearing a piece of lettuce when eating a salad) and not actually chew the food. That is the distinct role of the back teeth.

The oral facial environment along with the two jaw joints, is one of the most complex neuromuscular systems in the body. The jaw joint is the most complex joint in the human body. It is on the move, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every time we swallow. In the middle of the night, when we swallow while we are sleeping, the TM joints are in motion and “working”.

The jaw joints, teeth and the muscles controlling all the action, movement, and how they meet and occlude, (bite) is a very complex system with all parts interconnected. When multiple teeth are lost and not replaced, the entire system becomes less efficient and the component ‘parts’, start to wear down. This is very evident when one thinks about how many times one is out socially and in conversation with someone, and they look like they have worn down teeth or their teeth have disappeared under their lip!

When people show up at the dental office to get these issues attended to, these treatments become extremely complicated, involved and expensive. "It is very clear that replacing a missing tooth when it is lost, is a less expensive and a far healthier approach to your general and dental health, than leaving it until there is more breakdown."